Daily Archives: August 27, 2008

>MEDIA ADVISORY: DEMOCRATIC PARTY PRESS CONFERENCE (SEPT. 2)

>MIDDLETOWN TOWNSHIP (MONMOUTH COUNTY, NJ):
Middletown Democrats for Township Committee

PATRICIA A. WALSH and JIM GRENAFEGE will be holding a press conference on TUESDAY, SEPT.
2 outside the POLICE ENTRANCE to TOWN HALL, 1 KING’S HIGHWAY, AT 6:30 PM.

Mrs. Walsh and Mr. Grenafege will be discussing budgetary problems they intend to repair
once elected.

The president of the Bayshore Democratic Club, Mr. Greg Gibadlo, will be hosting the
event.

All media and residents are invited.

Special Note: This press conference will be held before that evenings township committee meeting so it should be an event in itself worth the price of admission.

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Filed under Bayshore Democratic Club, Greg Gibadlo, Jim Grenafege, Middletown Democrats, Middletown Township, Patricia Walsh

MEDIA ADVISORY: DEMOCRATIC PARTY PRESS CONFERENCE (SEPT. 2)

MIDDLETOWN TOWNSHIP (MONMOUTH COUNTY, NJ):
Middletown Democrats for Township Committee

PATRICIA A. WALSH and JIM GRENAFEGE will be holding a press conference on TUESDAY, SEPT.
2 outside the POLICE ENTRANCE to TOWN HALL, 1 KING’S HIGHWAY, AT 6:30 PM.

Mrs. Walsh and Mr. Grenafege will be discussing budgetary problems they intend to repair
once elected.

The president of the Bayshore Democratic Club, Mr. Greg Gibadlo, will be hosting the
event.

All media and residents are invited.

Special Note: This press conference will be held before that evenings township committee meeting so it should be an event in itself worth the price of admission.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bayshore Democratic Club, Greg Gibadlo, Jim Grenafege, Middletown Democrats, Middletown Township, Patricia Walsh

>Anyone who doubts President Clinton’s commitment to electing Barack Obama should tune in tonight

>The Hill – Leading the News
By Sam Youngman

DENVER — An aide to former president Bill Clinton said Tuesday, “Anyone who doubts President Clinton’s commitment to electing Barack Obama should tune in Wednesday night.”

Seeking to douse reports that Clinton remains angry about Obama’s victory in the Democratic presidential primary, Matt McKenna, a Clinton spokesman, said he was not undercutting the nominee in remarks to foreign dignitaries in which he seemed to suggest Democrats were making a mistake.

“It’s unfortunate that some in the media feel the need to twist every statement to fit a manufactured storyline,” McKenna said. “This was a serious discussion about solving some of the world’s most serious problems, not party politics.”
The Hill reported Tuesday that the former president, speaking just hours before his wife, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.), was to address the convention from the podium, said: “Suppose, for example, you’re a voter. And you’ve got candidate X and candidate Y. Candidate X agrees with you on everything, but you don’t think that person can deliver on anything. Candidate Y disagrees with you on half the issues, but you believe that on the other half, the candidate will be able to deliver. For whom would you vote?”

Then, perhaps mindful of how his off-the-cuff remarks might be taken, Clinton added after a pause: “This has nothing to do with what’s going on now.”

The comments are unlikely to be taken as an innocent mistake by those Democrats angry with the former president for, they say, not supporting the Illinois senator wholeheartedly, if not implicitly undercutting him.

The former president talked about the importance of a politician being able to deliver on his promises following an electoral victory and how voters factor in that ability when picking their candidate.

During the contentious and at times nasty nomination battle between Sens. Clinton and Obama (Ill.), the Clinton campaign repeatedly pushed the question of whether Obama, a freshman senator, had the experience or the ability to deliver on his promises if elected. Clinton, they argued, was more suited to do so.

The former president devoted much of his remarks to solving the global energy crisis and the need to address climate change.

But time and again he returned to his great love of politics, noting that it was not only the closeness and intensity of the nomination battle between his wife and Obama that piqued his interest this year, but also the “infusion of cash from small amounts by Internet donors and the explosion of blog sites.”

“For those of us interested in politics, it was an endlessly fascinating process already, and it’s still got some twists and turns between now and November,” Bill Clinton said.
The former president did say early in his remarks that the purpose of a party convention is to “introduce the candidate in a new and different and hopefully more positive way … [to] unify the party and [aid in] defining the battle” between the two parties.

The unifying-the-party aspect is what has many Democrats concerned about Clinton’s Wednesday-night remarks.

Clinton has been a media magnet throughout the year as his remarks have caused heartache and headaches for former and current supporters.

From when he called Obama’s candidacy “a fairytale” to when he compared the Illinois senator’s win in South Carolina to that of the Rev. Jesse Jackson in 1988, many Clinton loyalists, detractors and analysts feel that Clinton did irreparable damage to both his wife’s candidacy and his legacy as president.
Now in a convention that continues to be racked with stories and questions about how unified the Democratic Party truly is, Clinton’s appearance Wednesday — and his tendency to go off the teleprompter — has some Democrats very nervous.

Former Clinton aide and Democratic strategist Paul Begala, however, told The Hill that the former president is solidly behind Obama’s candidacy.

“He’s totally for Barack,” Begala said Tuesday. “He’s totally for Barack.”

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Filed under Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Democratic National Convention, Sam Youngman, The Hill

Anyone who doubts President Clinton’s commitment to electing Barack Obama should tune in tonight

The Hill – Leading the News
By Sam Youngman

DENVER — An aide to former president Bill Clinton said Tuesday, “Anyone who doubts President Clinton’s commitment to electing Barack Obama should tune in Wednesday night.”

Seeking to douse reports that Clinton remains angry about Obama’s victory in the Democratic presidential primary, Matt McKenna, a Clinton spokesman, said he was not undercutting the nominee in remarks to foreign dignitaries in which he seemed to suggest Democrats were making a mistake.

“It’s unfortunate that some in the media feel the need to twist every statement to fit a manufactured storyline,” McKenna said. “This was a serious discussion about solving some of the world’s most serious problems, not party politics.”
The Hill reported Tuesday that the former president, speaking just hours before his wife, Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.), was to address the convention from the podium, said: “Suppose, for example, you’re a voter. And you’ve got candidate X and candidate Y. Candidate X agrees with you on everything, but you don’t think that person can deliver on anything. Candidate Y disagrees with you on half the issues, but you believe that on the other half, the candidate will be able to deliver. For whom would you vote?”

Then, perhaps mindful of how his off-the-cuff remarks might be taken, Clinton added after a pause: “This has nothing to do with what’s going on now.”

The comments are unlikely to be taken as an innocent mistake by those Democrats angry with the former president for, they say, not supporting the Illinois senator wholeheartedly, if not implicitly undercutting him.

The former president talked about the importance of a politician being able to deliver on his promises following an electoral victory and how voters factor in that ability when picking their candidate.

During the contentious and at times nasty nomination battle between Sens. Clinton and Obama (Ill.), the Clinton campaign repeatedly pushed the question of whether Obama, a freshman senator, had the experience or the ability to deliver on his promises if elected. Clinton, they argued, was more suited to do so.

The former president devoted much of his remarks to solving the global energy crisis and the need to address climate change.

But time and again he returned to his great love of politics, noting that it was not only the closeness and intensity of the nomination battle between his wife and Obama that piqued his interest this year, but also the “infusion of cash from small amounts by Internet donors and the explosion of blog sites.”

“For those of us interested in politics, it was an endlessly fascinating process already, and it’s still got some twists and turns between now and November,” Bill Clinton said.
The former president did say early in his remarks that the purpose of a party convention is to “introduce the candidate in a new and different and hopefully more positive way … [to] unify the party and [aid in] defining the battle” between the two parties.

The unifying-the-party aspect is what has many Democrats concerned about Clinton’s Wednesday-night remarks.

Clinton has been a media magnet throughout the year as his remarks have caused heartache and headaches for former and current supporters.

From when he called Obama’s candidacy “a fairytale” to when he compared the Illinois senator’s win in South Carolina to that of the Rev. Jesse Jackson in 1988, many Clinton loyalists, detractors and analysts feel that Clinton did irreparable damage to both his wife’s candidacy and his legacy as president.
Now in a convention that continues to be racked with stories and questions about how unified the Democratic Party truly is, Clinton’s appearance Wednesday — and his tendency to go off the teleprompter — has some Democrats very nervous.

Former Clinton aide and Democratic strategist Paul Begala, however, told The Hill that the former president is solidly behind Obama’s candidacy.

“He’s totally for Barack,” Begala said Tuesday. “He’s totally for Barack.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Democratic National Convention, Sam Youngman, The Hill

Hillary Clinton speaks at convention. The press concocts a story


After last nights rousing and historic address in front of the Democratic National Convention in which Hillary Clinton gave her support to Barack Obama, Eric Boehlert has a an enlightening column over at Media Matters today.

For weeks now political pundits and the media have been questioning Clinton’s motives for allowing her name to be placed into nomination for the presidency tonight. They have claimed that this is all a ploy by the Clinton’s to promote disharmony among rank and file Democrats and to somehow steal the spotlight and nomination away from Obama.

This is simply not true.

In his column, Boehlert puts into historical perspective last night speech by Hillary Clinton and what it means to the Democrats to have her name be placed into nomination. The Clinton critics all seem to forget their convention history when it comes to Hillary.

Click on the headline to read Eric Boehlert’s column

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Filed under Barack Obama, Democratic National Convention, Eric Boehlert, Hillary Clinton, Media Matters

Hillary Clinton speaks at convention. The press concocts a story


After last nights rousing and historic address in front of the Democratic National Convention in which Hillary Clinton gave her support to Barack Obama, Eric Boehlert has a an enlightening column over at Media Matters today.

For weeks now political pundits and the media have been questioning Clinton’s motives for allowing her name to be placed into nomination for the presidency tonight. They have claimed that this is all a ploy by the Clinton’s to promote disharmony among rank and file Democrats and to somehow steal the spotlight and nomination away from Obama.

This is simply not true.

In his column, Boehlert puts into historical perspective last night speech by Hillary Clinton and what it means to the Democrats to have her name be placed into nomination. The Clinton critics all seem to forget their convention history when it comes to Hillary.

Click on the headline to read Eric Boehlert’s column

Leave a comment

Filed under Barack Obama, Democratic National Convention, Eric Boehlert, Hillary Clinton, Media Matters

>Union leader: Racism keeps Obama from building lead

>The Hill
By Kevin Bogardus

DENVER — A prominent union leader on Tuesday blamed racism for Sen. Barack Obama’s (D-Ill.) failure to build a big lead over GOP rival Sen. John McCain.

Gerald McEntee, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), said many workers are considering voting for McCain (R-Ariz.) because of his military service and status as a hero of the Vietnam War.

McEntee said several union members had approached him, saying they could not vote for Obama because of his race. He also said some local union presidents have failed to support Obama out of fear.
“There are some local union presidents that are afraid — yes, that’s the word, afraid — to hand out literature for Barack Obama,” said McEntee.

McEntee said union members need to consider Obama’s voting record on labor issues, not his race.

“You can’t vote for Barack Obama because he’s black? That’s bulls–t. Absolute bulls–t,” said McEntee to a standing ovation from the crowd.

McEntee said that the race between Obama and McCain should not be close and that the Democrat should have a much bigger lead in the polls.

“We have to wake up, wake up our own members,” said McEntee. “It’s a no-brainer, a no-brainer.”

McEntee encouraged the Illinois delegates to campaign in other states for Obama, since they know the senator best.

Key Democrats this week have voiced worries that Obama does not have a bigger lead over McCain, who is hampered by President Bush’s unpopularity. Other union officials also have cited Obama’s race as a reason why some white union members are not embracing him.

McEntee said McCain is not a friend of unions and members must campaign for Obama and spread the message of his support for labor. He said unions will be in deep trouble if Obama is defeated for the presidency.

“If we don’t win those states — excuse my language, I know it’s early — but we will be in the proverbial s–thouse for the next four years,” McEntee said.

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Filed under AFSCME, Barack Obama, Gerald McEntee, John McCain, Kevin Bogardus, racism, The Hill