Daily Archives: September 1, 2008

>The Obama team not using national polls

>According to Mark Blumenthal of the Progressive, Obama’s massive turnout effort (including 600,000 new voters in Florida) and innovative polling methods suggest that the traditional polls used by journalists may be way off.

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Filed under 2008 Presidential Campaign, Barack Obama, Presidential Polls, The Progressive

The Obama team not using national polls

According to Mark Blumenthal of the Progressive, Obama’s massive turnout effort (including 600,000 new voters in Florida) and innovative polling methods suggest that the traditional polls used by journalists may be way off.

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Filed under 2008 Presidential Campaign, Barack Obama, Presidential Polls, The Progressive

>Surprise? First Two National Polls Find Palin Gains LESS Support from Women

>The first national polls on John McCain’s pick of Sarah Palin yesterday came out today from Rasmussen and Gallup — and contrary to what the GOP probably hoped, she scored less well with women than men.

Here’s a finding from Gallup: Among Democratic women — including those who may be disappointed that Hillary Clinton did not win the Democratic nomination — 9% say Palin makes them more likely to support McCain, 15% less likely.

From Rasmussen: Some 38% of men said they were more likely to vote for McCain now, but only 32% of women. By a narrow 41% to 35% margin, men said she was not ready to be president — but women soundly rejected her, 48% to 25%.

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Filed under Gallup poll, Rasmussen poll, Sarah Palin, Vice-President

Surprise? First Two National Polls Find Palin Gains LESS Support from Women

The first national polls on John McCain’s pick of Sarah Palin yesterday came out today from Rasmussen and Gallup — and contrary to what the GOP probably hoped, she scored less well with women than men.

Here’s a finding from Gallup: Among Democratic women — including those who may be disappointed that Hillary Clinton did not win the Democratic nomination — 9% say Palin makes them more likely to support McCain, 15% less likely.

From Rasmussen: Some 38% of men said they were more likely to vote for McCain now, but only 32% of women. By a narrow 41% to 35% margin, men said she was not ready to be president — but women soundly rejected her, 48% to 25%.

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Filed under Gallup poll, Rasmussen poll, Sarah Palin, Vice-President

Labor Day History

To all of the workers who are enjoying themselves a much deserved holiday today, here is a little history behind the founding of Labor Day courtesy of History.com.



As the Industrial Revolution took hold of the nation, the average American in the late 1800s worked 12-hour days, seven days a week in order to make a basic living. Children were also working, as they provided cheap labor to employers and laws against child labor were not strongly enforced.

With the long hours and terrible working conditions, American unions became more prominent and voiced their demands for a better way of life. On Tuesday September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers marched from city hall to Union Square in New York City, holding the first-ever Labor Day parade. Participants took an unpaid day-off to honor the workers of America, as well as vocalize issues they had with employers. As years passed, more states began to hold these parades, but Congress would not legalize the holiday until 12 years later.

On May 11, 1894, workers of the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago struck to protest wage cuts and the firing of union representatives. They sought support from their union led by Eugene V. Debs and on June 26 the American Railroad Union called a boycott of all Pullman railway cars. Within days, 50,000 rail workers complied and railroad traffic out of Chicago came to a halt. On July 4, President Grover Cleveland dispatched troops to Chicago. Much rioting and bloodshed ensued, but the government’s actions broke the strike and the boycott soon collapsed. Debs and three other union officials were jailed for disobeying the injunction. The strike brought worker’s rights to the public eye and Congress declared, in 1894, that the first Monday in September would be the holiday for workers, known as Labor Day.

The founder of Labor Day remains unclear, but some credit either Peter McGuire, co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, or Matthew Maguire, a secretary of the Central Labor Union, for proposing the holiday.

Although Labor Day is meant as a celebration of the labor movement and its achievements, it has come to be celebrated as the last, long summer weekend before Autumn.

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Filed under Arlo Guthrie, History.com, Labor Day, Pete Seeger

Labor Day History

To all of the workers who are enjoying themselves a much deserved holiday today, here is a little history behind the founding of Labor Day courtesy of History.com.



As the Industrial Revolution took hold of the nation, the average American in the late 1800s worked 12-hour days, seven days a week in order to make a basic living. Children were also working, as they provided cheap labor to employers and laws against child labor were not strongly enforced.

With the long hours and terrible working conditions, American unions became more prominent and voiced their demands for a better way of life. On Tuesday September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers marched from city hall to Union Square in New York City, holding the first-ever Labor Day parade. Participants took an unpaid day-off to honor the workers of America, as well as vocalize issues they had with employers. As years passed, more states began to hold these parades, but Congress would not legalize the holiday until 12 years later.

On May 11, 1894, workers of the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago struck to protest wage cuts and the firing of union representatives. They sought support from their union led by Eugene V. Debs and on June 26 the American Railroad Union called a boycott of all Pullman railway cars. Within days, 50,000 rail workers complied and railroad traffic out of Chicago came to a halt. On July 4, President Grover Cleveland dispatched troops to Chicago. Much rioting and bloodshed ensued, but the government’s actions broke the strike and the boycott soon collapsed. Debs and three other union officials were jailed for disobeying the injunction. The strike brought worker’s rights to the public eye and Congress declared, in 1894, that the first Monday in September would be the holiday for workers, known as Labor Day.

The founder of Labor Day remains unclear, but some credit either Peter McGuire, co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, or Matthew Maguire, a secretary of the Central Labor Union, for proposing the holiday.

Although Labor Day is meant as a celebration of the labor movement and its achievements, it has come to be celebrated as the last, long summer weekend before Autumn.

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Filed under Arlo Guthrie, History.com, Labor Day, Pete Seeger

>GOP Asks ‘Chicago Tribune’ Not to Publish Errant ‘Rush Limbaugh’ Email — Doesn’t Stop Paper

>What to do when you are mistakenly sent a highly provocative, even distasteful, email from a political party staffer and are then asked not to publish its contents? The issue came up again today when the Chicago Tribune received an email from a GOP staffer regarding a suggestion that the party post something on YouTube regarding a radio comment by Rush Limbaugh related to Sarah Palin’s new baby and Barack Obama’s view of abortion.

Here is an excerpt from a posting on the Tribune’s popular blog, The Swamp, by Andrew Zajac.
*
Conservative radio commentator Rush Limbaugh boosted Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin’s pro-life position and mocked Barack Obama on his radio show yesterday with a make-believe riff in which Obama asked Palin “When you found out your baby would be born with Down syndrome, did you consider killing it before or after the due date?”

Limbaugh’s “humor” caught the fancy of the Republican National Committee, which, in an internal e-mail, proposed using the bit in a YouTube clip.

The e-mail, which was sent to RNC Communications Director Danny Diaz, and mistakenly to a Tribune reporter, was titled “wow…good YouTube potential…”

Click on the headline to read more

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Filed under Barack Obama, Chicago Tribune, GOP email, Rush Limbaugh, Sarah Palin