Daily Archives: May 5, 2011

>Middletown-Patch: Freeholder Amy Mallet Explains County Politics to Brookdale Students

>Nice right up on Freeholder Amy Mallet today online at MiddeltownPatch. Freeholder Mallet gave an informative to students presentation to students in an American National Government class at Brookdale Community College the other day.

It’s good to see her out and about giving back to the community like she does, I can’t remember hearing about any of her colleagues on the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders doing the same recently.
According to the article Mallet, “delivered a PowerPoint presentation that offered a brief history of Monmouth County and the Board of Chosen Freeholders. For instance, students learned that the term “freeholder” is a holdover to a time when it meant anyone who owned land “free and clear.” Those persons who were elected to represent those landowners were called “chosen freeholders.”…


She also “suggested that the students attend public meetings, establish a dialogue with elected officials and familiarize themselves with the county website, www.visitmonmouth.com.

“Brookdale students attend one of the finest two-year learning institutions in the state,” Mallet said. “The Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders has always supported the college and its students, and it’s important they know they have the board’s continued support.”


You can read the full article >>> Here

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Filed under Board of Chosen Freeholders, Brookdale Community College, Freeholder Amy Mallet, MiddletownPatch.com, Monmouth County, New Jersey

>As A Matter Of Fact…What did NJ get for $1 billion? About 5,000 fewer jobs.

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May 5th, 2011 | Published in NJPP Blog: As a Matter of Fact …

Since the beginning of 2010, New Jersey has awarded more than $1 billion in tax subsidies as part of a strategy aimed at jump-starting the state’s economy and putting tens of thousands of people back to work.

Even as Governor Christie pleaded poverty to make deep cuts to essential services like education and health care, the state doled out tax credits and grants to corporations and developers in New Jersey at an unprecedented rate.

Incentives for economic investment were necessary, it was argued, to create a more business-friendly climate that would generate good jobs for New Jerseyans.

Sadly, it hasn’t worked. Not even a little bit.

Employment statewide is down more than 5,000 jobs since the beginning of 2010.

Last month, 3,847,200 people were employed in New Jersey, according to the state Department of Labor and Work Force Development’s monthly non-farm employment report, which is available here. That’s down 5,100 from the 3,852,600 who were employed in January 2010, when the state embarked on probably the most generous business subsidy effort New Jersey has ever seen. (For more, see NJPP’s report A Surge in Subsidies.) It’s also a precipitous drop – 231,700 jobs – from peak employment of 4,078,900 in 2007.

A breakdown of the data shows the state has lost 7,600 manufacturing jobs and 4,500 construction jobs in the private sector since January 2010. They also show the state has lost 24,400 public sector jobs — as teachers, police and other employees were laid off. Those 36,500 lost jobs were offset somewhat by a gain in the service sector of nearly 31,000 jobs.

The decline in employed New Jerseyans might come as a surprise to some who’ve assumed that the economy was improving because the state unemployment rate dropped from 9.8 percent to 9.3 percent during that time. (The U.S. rate, over the same period, has fallen twice as fast, from 10.0 percent to 8.8 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.)

But it turns out the drop in the state unemployment rate is a statistical anomaly because, since January 2010, the state’s labor force — the number of people working plus those looking for work — actually declined to 4,493,000 from 4,522,200 as people moved away or gave up on the hope of finding a job. So the unemployment rate didn’t go down because more people are working; it went down because fewer people are looking.

Seems like there might have been a better way to spend that $1 billion….

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Filed under corporate tax breaks, Gov. Chris Christie, New Jersey, New Jersey Policy Perspective, tax subsidies, unemployment rate

>APP: Middletown board hears controversial housing plan

>The Asbury Park Press this morning has a good write up on last night’s Middletown Planning Board meeting with some additional background information that pertains to the Bam Hollow development and how 1200 housing units were originally scheduled to be built there.

The article was written by Kevin Penton and is a pretty accurate description of what went on durning the discussion of the Avaya redevelopment hearing last night.

You can also checkout the raw video from last night’s Middletown Planning Board meeting that I have posted in the previous post.

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Filed under Asbury Park Press, Avaya, Bam Hollow, kevin penton, Lincroft NJ, Middletown NJ, Raw Video

>Raw Video: Middletown Planning Board Discusses Avaya Re-Development

>For those that were unable to attend the Middletown Planning Board meeting last night don’t fret, I took a few picture and shot an hour’s worth of video from the proceeding.

The meeting started at 6:30 pm but because of old business before the planning board, the discussions concerning the Avaya redevelopment project didn’t start until 7:25 pm and lasted only an hour. It was explained that further meetings would be needed in front of the planning board over the course of the next few months before any decisions concerning the site would be made.
I would say that there were easily 250 or more Lincroft area residents in attendance for this initial site presentation. Unfortunately none were afforded an opportunity to speak their minds about it because no public comments on the project were allowed at this time. It was stated that after all testimony before the planning board was given, lawyers for various community groups would be given a chance to cross examine the witnesses and residents would have a chance to speak.
Below is raw video from the night’s meeting, it lasts an hour and captured all but the first minute of the meeting (I wasn’t fast enough turning on the camera, sorry)

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Filed under 342 units, Avaya, COAH, Lincroft NJ, lincroft village green association, Middletown NJ, Middletown Planning Board, Monmouth County, Raw Video, Sonic