Category Archives: Abraham Lincoln

Labor Day Quote of The Day

“If any man tells you he loves America, yet hates labor, he is a liar. If any man tells you he trusts America, yet fears labor, he is a fool.” -Abraham Lincoln

Hat Tip to BeingLiberal.org

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Filed under Abraham Lincoln, Labor Day, labor unions, Quote of the day

The Abraham Lincoln Analogy

On this , the 200th birthday of president Abraham Lincoln, Katharine Q. Seelye of the NY Times has just posted the following article about how past and current Presidents have invoked Lincoln to shape their own presidencies. 

Ms. Seelye goes to great lengths to describe how President Obama has used the Lincoln analogies to shape his image as a leader and how he used them very successfully to guide his campaign and his young presidency:
Barack Obama is not the first president to feel a kinship with Abraham Lincoln. Nixon made at least one midnight visit to the Lincoln Memorial for a talk with the great man’s statue. Teddy Roosevelt wore a ring that was made from a lock of Lincoln’s hair. Franklin Roosevelt hired Robert Sherwood, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his play, “Abe Lincoln in Illinois,” as his speechwriter.

But Mr. Obama has taken the identification with the 16th president to a new level. He began his presidential campaign two years ago in Springfield, Ill., Lincoln’s home, on the weekend of Lincoln’s birthday. And he comes full circle on Thursday, Lincoln’s 200th birthday. After speaking in honor of Lincoln at the Capitol Rotunda in the morning (“I feel a special gratitude to this singular figure who in so many ways made my own story possible,” he said), he journeys back to Springfield to deliver another tribute in the evening.

Of course, the timing of his election with Lincoln’s bicentennial, being celebrated today around the country, is coincidental. Still, we wondered if Mr. Obama could over-do the Lincoln analogy. Is it in his political interest to mind-meld with another president? Is he being presumptuous? Is he raising expectations?

Mr. Obama’s pilgrimages to Springfield are bookends to a period in which he has elevated Lincoln to the status of, well, almost a co-president. He quoted Lincoln throughout the campaign and mimicked the trappings of his inauguration, down to copying the menu for his inaugural lunch from Lincoln’s, and having the food served on replicas of the china that Mary Todd Lincoln chose for the White House. On Wednesday, Mr. Obama even joined a star-studded celebration for the rededication of Ford’s Theatre, where Lincoln was assassinated.

We talked with several historians and analysts about the political benefits and the risks for Mr. Obama in keeping Lincoln so close at hand. Most generally agreed that the advantages outweigh any disadvantages, which explains why he’s still doing it.

Harold Holzer, a Lincoln scholar and co-chairman of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, says he believes that Mr. Obama feels a genuine kinship with Lincoln. That said, he suggests that in the early days of the campaign, resurrecting Lincoln had a political purpose — he was an example of someone who didn’t have much Washington experience and yet went on to become a great president.

   
Read more >>> Here

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Filed under 200th birthday, Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln analogy, Lincoln scholars, NY Times, President Obama

>The Abraham Lincoln Analogy

>

On this , the 200th birthday of president Abraham Lincoln, Katharine Q. Seelye of the NY Times has just posted the following article about how past and current Presidents have invoked Lincoln to shape their own presidencies. 

Ms. Seelye goes to great lengths to describe how President Obama has used the Lincoln analogies to shape his image as a leader and how he used them very successfully to guide his campaign and his young presidency:
Barack Obama is not the first president to feel a kinship with Abraham Lincoln. Nixon made at least one midnight visit to the Lincoln Memorial for a talk with the great man’s statue. Teddy Roosevelt wore a ring that was made from a lock of Lincoln’s hair. Franklin Roosevelt hired Robert Sherwood, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his play, “Abe Lincoln in Illinois,” as his speechwriter.

But Mr. Obama has taken the identification with the 16th president to a new level. He began his presidential campaign two years ago in Springfield, Ill., Lincoln’s home, on the weekend of Lincoln’s birthday. And he comes full circle on Thursday, Lincoln’s 200th birthday. After speaking in honor of Lincoln at the Capitol Rotunda in the morning (“I feel a special gratitude to this singular figure who in so many ways made my own story possible,” he said), he journeys back to Springfield to deliver another tribute in the evening.

Of course, the timing of his election with Lincoln’s bicentennial, being celebrated today around the country, is coincidental. Still, we wondered if Mr. Obama could over-do the Lincoln analogy. Is it in his political interest to mind-meld with another president? Is he being presumptuous? Is he raising expectations?

Mr. Obama’s pilgrimages to Springfield are bookends to a period in which he has elevated Lincoln to the status of, well, almost a co-president. He quoted Lincoln throughout the campaign and mimicked the trappings of his inauguration, down to copying the menu for his inaugural lunch from Lincoln’s, and having the food served on replicas of the china that Mary Todd Lincoln chose for the White House. On Wednesday, Mr. Obama even joined a star-studded celebration for the rededication of Ford’s Theatre, where Lincoln was assassinated.

We talked with several historians and analysts about the political benefits and the risks for Mr. Obama in keeping Lincoln so close at hand. Most generally agreed that the advantages outweigh any disadvantages, which explains why he’s still doing it.

Harold Holzer, a Lincoln scholar and co-chairman of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, says he believes that Mr. Obama feels a genuine kinship with Lincoln. That said, he suggests that in the early days of the campaign, resurrecting Lincoln had a political purpose — he was an example of someone who didn’t have much Washington experience and yet went on to become a great president.

   
Read more >>> Here

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Filed under 200th birthday, Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln analogy, Lincoln scholars, NY Times, President Obama