Category Archives: immigration

>After TEA Party and Coffee Party What’s Next? A Tequila Party of Course

>While Republicans enjoy TEA and Progressives partake in Coffee another group would rather party with Tequila.

That’s right, there is a new party in town called the Tequila Party and both sides of the political fence should start taking notice because now the potentially largest minority voting block, the Hispanics, has come together to see that their interests in jobs, immigration and education do not go unnoticed by Republicans and Democrats in office.

…The newly formed grass-roots group sprouted from a growing frustration among Hispanic voters that neither party is doing much to help the nation’s immigrant population and that the tea parties have turned the tide against them.

Rather than swear allegiance to one party or the other, Tequila Party members said they plan to form a Hispanic voting bloc so strong that they can no longer be ignored.
“We’re not telling anybody how to vote. We don’t care, because we do bad anyway at the polls. Right now, we need to get over that hurdle,” said DeeDee Garcia Blase, the group’s founder and president….
…”Democrats take the Latino community for granted, and Republicans tend to assume that Latinos don’t vote or that they always vote Democrat,” Quasius said. “We think both parties’ perceptions of Latinos need to be fairly shaken up.”…
You can read more about this online at Roll Call

Leave a comment

Filed under Coffee Party, Democrats, immigration, Latino and Hispanic voters, Republicans, Roll Call, Tea Party, Tequila Party

What the Next President Inherits

What could be more important than the upcoming election? What the next president actually does once elected. While a feverish media dissects Palins wardrobe and plumbs Joe Wurzelbachers biography, real challenges for America are piling up. Domestic struggles over marriage and abortion rights will define who we are, and our response to global conflicts and crises will define our place in the world. The end of the campaigning is just the beginning.

Leave a comment

Filed under America, bailout, Barack Obama, economy, Election, health insurance, Healthcare, immigration, Joe Biden, John McCain, mexico border fence, roe vs. wade, Sarah Palin, Supreme Court

What the Next President Inherits

What could be more important than the upcoming election? What the next president actually does once elected. While a feverish media dissects Palins wardrobe and plumbs Joe Wurzelbachers biography, real challenges for America are piling up. Domestic struggles over marriage and abortion rights will define who we are, and our response to global conflicts and crises will define our place in the world. The end of the campaigning is just the beginning.

Leave a comment

Filed under America, bailout, Barack Obama, economy, Election, health insurance, Healthcare, immigration, Joe Biden, John McCain, mexico border fence, roe vs. wade, Sarah Palin, Supreme Court

McCain’s history of hot temper raises concerns

By David Lightman and Matt Stearns | McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — John McCain made a quick stop at the Capitol one day last spring to sit in on Senate negotiations on the big immigration bill, and John Cornyn was not pleased.

Cornyn, a mild-mannered Texas Republican, saw a loophole in the bill that he thought would allow felons to pursue a path to citizenship.

McCain called Cornyn’s claim “chicken-s—,” according to people familiar with the meeting, and charged that the Texan was looking for an excuse to scuttle the bill. Cornyn grimly told McCain he had a lot of nerve to suddenly show up and inject himself into the sensitive negotiations.

“F— you,” McCain told Cornyn, in front of about 40 witnesses.

It was another instance of the Republican presidential candidate losing his temper, another instance where, as POW-MIA activist Carol Hrdlicka put it, “It’s his way or no way.”

There’s a lengthy list of similar outbursts through the years: McCain pushing a woman in a wheelchair, trying to get an Arizona Republican aide fired from three different jobs, berating a young GOP activist on the night of his own 1986 Senate election and many more.

McCain observers say the incidents have been blown out of proportion.

“I’ve never seen anything in the way of an outburst of temper that struck me as anything out of the ordinary,” said McCain biographer Robert Timberg.

“Those reports are overstated,” said Rives Richey, who attended Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., with McCain in the early 1950s.

Historians point out that it’s not unusual for a president to have a fierce temper, but most knew how to keep it under control.

“Harry Truman wrote scathing letters, but he almost never sent them,” said author Robert Dallek.

“George Washington spent a lifetime trying to control his temper,” added historian Richard Norton Smith.

But Washington didn’t have YouTube replaying videos of his tantrums, nor did he have to make decisions about nuclear weapons.

Read the full article hereimmigration

Leave a comment

Filed under hot temper, immigration, John McCain

>McCain’s history of hot temper raises concerns

>By David Lightman and Matt Stearns | McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON — John McCain made a quick stop at the Capitol one day last spring to sit in on Senate negotiations on the big immigration bill, and John Cornyn was not pleased.

Cornyn, a mild-mannered Texas Republican, saw a loophole in the bill that he thought would allow felons to pursue a path to citizenship.

McCain called Cornyn’s claim “chicken-s—,” according to people familiar with the meeting, and charged that the Texan was looking for an excuse to scuttle the bill. Cornyn grimly told McCain he had a lot of nerve to suddenly show up and inject himself into the sensitive negotiations.

“F— you,” McCain told Cornyn, in front of about 40 witnesses.

It was another instance of the Republican presidential candidate losing his temper, another instance where, as POW-MIA activist Carol Hrdlicka put it, “It’s his way or no way.”

There’s a lengthy list of similar outbursts through the years: McCain pushing a woman in a wheelchair, trying to get an Arizona Republican aide fired from three different jobs, berating a young GOP activist on the night of his own 1986 Senate election and many more.

McCain observers say the incidents have been blown out of proportion.

“I’ve never seen anything in the way of an outburst of temper that struck me as anything out of the ordinary,” said McCain biographer Robert Timberg.

“Those reports are overstated,” said Rives Richey, who attended Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., with McCain in the early 1950s.

Historians point out that it’s not unusual for a president to have a fierce temper, but most knew how to keep it under control.

“Harry Truman wrote scathing letters, but he almost never sent them,” said author Robert Dallek.

“George Washington spent a lifetime trying to control his temper,” added historian Richard Norton Smith.

But Washington didn’t have YouTube replaying videos of his tantrums, nor did he have to make decisions about nuclear weapons.

Read the full article hereimmigration

Leave a comment

Filed under hot temper, immigration, John McCain