Category Archives: Monmouth County

Scudiery Says GoodBye; Announces Intention To End Term As Monmouth County Democratic Chairman

Dear County Committee Member,

In looking back at nearly a quarter century in politics, you remember sweet victories and frustrating defeats. But what you remember most are the people. Once the victory night celebration has faded, the speeches have blurred and the music has quieted, the memory is of the people who worked with you, stood beside you and tried to make a positive difference.

For more than two decades, together we’ve stood side-by-side with Monmouth County and New Jersey’s working families. We’ve stood by those trying to do the right thing, those who work hard to make their children’s future brighter; those who get up every morning and go to work, who struggle to pay the mortgage and their utility bills, to put food on the table for their families; those who attend their places of worship with pride and dignity; those who coach their children’s Little League teams; those who attend the parent teacher conferences.

The wealthy and the powerful always have someone to speak for them; our party gives voice to those who would otherwise be voiceless. Together we have provided that voice and leadership.

During my tenure, New Jersey has elected a Democrat every time there’s been a state-wide federal election. We’ve won every state-wide Presidential and U.S. Senate election. We’ll do so again this year.

I take pride in the ideal that as Democrats we represent all of the people. Our candidates reflect the diversity of the most diverse state in the country. Our ticket this year will reflect that diversity. President Barrack Obama, the first African-American President and U.S. Senator Robert Menendez, our state’s first Hispanic United States Senator. We’ve come a long way in 23 years and proven that our Party is open to all. During my tenure New Jersey also elected its first Italian-American Governor and we’ve elected more women to office than any time in our history.

But as former Speaker of the House of Representatives Thomas “Tip” O’Neil said, “All politics is local.”

Here in Monmouth County we’ve provided outstanding leadership and built from the municipalities up a growing party that has made enormous strides. Our Mayors and Council members are providing innovative, open and honest government across Monmouth County. We took leadership back on the Freeholder Board and are positioned by developing an outstanding local farm team to provide Democratic leadership again.

During my time as chairman we worked together to take back the 12th Legislative District. We worked to defeat an incumbent Republican Congressman and to elect Congressman Rush Holt. U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone has represented much of our county for 24 years.

I believe we’ve been successful as a party because people like you got involved for the right reasons, not because they were looking for a title, status or any other aggrandizement. We succeed when we put the people and the party first.

I urge our Democratic leaders throughout New Jersey to work to stop the infighting and the deal making that pits one group in our party against another. We need to support policies that help the many and walk away from policies that seem to enrich just a few.

Perhaps my favorite memory of politics in Monmouth County is not of a race that we won, but the one that’s most vivid – my first. John Winterstella and Gene Anthony were candidates for Freeholder in my first year; Jack Manutti and Annie Grant contested the Constitutional Offices. In that year, Surrogate Patricia Bennett was our only Democratic county-wide official. I walked with the candidates every day and night, we campaigned hard for months, and in the end came up a few hundred votes short. But we launched the party in the right direction. We gave it a start.

After 23 years, I’ve decided to end my term as Chairman of the Monmouth County Democrats. But I know that because all of the work of dedicated, loyal Democrats like you, I will leave it in good hands.

From the bottom of my heart, I thank you for the honor and privilege of serving the Monmouth County Democrats and all of the people of Monmouth County.

To our friends in organized labor; everyone who’s ever stuffed an envelope, made a phone call or talked to your neighbors to help elect a Council member or President; everyone who’s given of their time and their money to support our candidates; all of those who have put themselves before the voters and stood up for our party and its principles; all of those who have been selfless in their dedication to a cause that’s right, I thank you.

Godspeed,

Victor V. Scudiery, Chairman
Monmouth County Democrats, Inc.

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Filed under Board of Chosen Freeholders, Chairman, Frank Pallone, Monmouth County, Monmouth County Democrats, Robert Menendez, Rush Holt, Victor Scudiery

APP Editorial: Shameful start out of the box

Here is an editorial that the Asbury Park Press has gotten right and if you read the comment posted by readers afterwards, they all seem to agree:

The new 5-0 Republican majority on the Monmouth County freeholder board got off to a disgraceful start this week: Its first order of business was rescinding its tough 2008 pay-to-play campaign finance restrictions. Welcome back to the world of one-party rule.

The old ground rules, passed in response to Operation Bid Rig, a sting targeting money laundering and political corruption that led to the arrests of 13 politicians in the county in 2005, was a huge step in putting an end to the sort of legal bribery that allowed graft to flow freely.

The freeholders now seem to believe that graft and corruption are a thing of the past. Either that or they want to cement their one-party grip on the board, briefly lost the past few years, by ensuring campaign contributors are aptly rewarded when it comes time to handing out contracts.

Under the previous rules, individual contributions were capped at $300, while a firm’s contribution was limited to $2,600. Candidates could not accept a contribution from another county’s political party in excess of $2,600 per election.

Now that those rules have been rescinded, the board will be guided by the state’s lenient “fair and open” bidding process for counties and municipalities, which state Comptroller Matthew Boxer has said is anything but.

In a commentary in the Press last year, Boxer wrote, “The pay-to-play law presents few, if any, real obstacles to local government entities seeking to reward politically favored vendors with public contracts … a series of fatal flaws have essentially rendered the pay-to-play law meaningless at the local government level.”

What reason did the freeholders offer for changing their minds? Freeholder Lillian Burry, who voted for the tougher pay-to-play regulations in 2008, said they made sense then: “It appeared at the time to be a very necessary thing for us to do,” Burry said.

But now? Burry says the 2008 rules may be “too harsh” and proved “very confusing to the professionals.”

The freeholders apparently would have us believe that the people who want to do business with Monmouth County were absolutely flummoxed by the 2008 county standard, and could not fathom the differences between the county’s rules and the “fair and open” process.

If the freeholders adequately educated potential contract bidders to those differences and they still couldn’t get it, those aren’t the sort of people the county should be hiring in the first place.

What is clear is the freeholders’ action was shameless. They should reinstate the tougher pay-to-play rules. If they don’t, citizens should express their disgust at the polls.

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Filed under Asbury Park Press, editorial, Lillian Burry, Monmouth County, Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Operation Bid Rig, pay-to-play

Crime Scene Middletown: Local Crime Statistics Mirror County’s But Appear To Be On The Rise For 2011

The Asbury Park Press has an article posted about the rising crime rate for Monmouth and Ocean Counties. It states that according to the NJ State Police Uniform Crime Report for 2010 incidents of major crime( violent crimes of murder, rape, robbery and aggravated assault, and the nonviolent crimes of burglary, larceny and motor vehicle theft) rose by 7% in Ocean County and 4% in Monmouth County in the year following 2009.

Seeing how I reside in Middletown, which has a population of 67,000 residents spreadout over 42 square miles, I am not really interested in what is happening in Ocean County, I’m more interested in what’s happening closer to home.

According to the APP article:

In Monmouth County, most categories of violent crime remained stable, although aggravated assaults fell 11 percent. The increase in overall major crimes in Monmouth County was partly attributable to a 6.5 percent uptick in the number of burglaries, from 2,528 to 2,694.

Monmouth County saw a 24 percent jump in the number of arrests for the sale or manufacture of drugs, from 455 to 562

After reading the full article it made me a bit curious about what has been going on in Middletown over this same time period, what I found locally seems to have mirrored what happened county wide.

In Middletown, while the crime index for 2010 rose a mere 0.84% over the 2009 index (12.39 vs 13.23), the incidents of Part I Crimes (Murder, Rape, Robbery, Agg. Assault,Burglary, Larceny, Auto Theft, Arson) rose 5.2% (2009/828 vs 2010/873) and the incidents of Part II Crimes (Simple Assaut,Forgery, Fraud, Embezzlement,Vandalism, Weapons, Other Sex Offenses, Disorderly Conduct and Other) rose 13% (2009/4454 vs 2010/5111).

I found this information posted on the Middletown Township website posted under the Police Department link for the year to date Crime Stats. I’ve been keeping an eye on these statistics for most of the year, after I discovered them posted on the Township website a number of months ago. The stat sheet compares the crime index and incidents of crime in Middletown going back to 2002 and has been recently updated to include incidents of crime through October 2011.

Looking at the reported numbers thus far for 2011, it seems that the crime rate in Middletown will be somewhat higher than it was in 2010. With two months left to report crime statistics, Part I type crimes total 690 while Part II type crimes total 3932. Interestingly (or not), the arrest rate is also up over last year thus far (1599),which I suppose should be expected given the increase in incidents.

Calls for service is also up sharply and should exceed last years total of 45,587 which is staggering to me when you consider how understaffed Middletown’s Police Department is,on the flip side of that however, is that the number of summonses written thus far this year. It seems that summonses issued should also top the total of 6,473 that were issued in 2010.

Given the numbers, I think members of Middletown’s Police Department should be commended for the hard work and effort they give keeping us all safe during this time of increased criminal activity.

Residents are quick to criticize when response times are slow or when they see a police car parked on the side of the road with an officer just sitting there seeming to be doing nothing and are slow to give credit for a job well done under stressful circumstances.

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Filed under Asbury Park Press, burglary, Crime Scene Middletown, crime statistics, Middletown Police Report, Monmouth County, murder, NJ State Police Uniformed Crime Report, rape, robbery

A Good Night for the Democrats; The Dems pick up one seat in the Assembly, while the Republicans lose all key races, despite Christie’s campaigning

While it wasn’t such a good night for being a Democrat in Middletown or a candidate for state office in Monmouth County, Democrats did increase their majorities in Trenton and a consolidation vote between two Princeton towns to merge into one municipality to save on property taxes is looked at as an anomaly rather than the next wave of the future as many would hope for.

NJspotlight has a pretty good wrap up of last nights events worth reading today:

Despite tough, nasty contests in a few races and more than $25 million spent, very little changed in the New Jersey legislature on election night. The Democrats gained one seat in the Assembly and still control both legislative houses. The Republicans lost all the key races that they targeted and where Gov. Chris Christie campaigned.

In the most hotly contested races, Democratic incumbents James Whelan in South Jersey’s 2nd District and Robert Gordon in North Jersey’s 38th won by relatively comfortable margins.

And Richard Codey, the incumbent Democratic senator in the 27th, prevailed. Some had predicted he would run into trouble given that redistricting had shifted several Morris County municipalities into his home territory.

The Democrats also picked up one Assembly seat in the 4th.

Two ballot questions, one statewide and one local, also won.

About two-thirds of New Jersey voters approved the one question on the ballot: to allow sports betting in New Jersey should Congress give other states besides the four already approved the OK at a future date. And voters in Princeton and Princeton Township also approved a momentous merger question. It would be the first time in more than half a century that two New Jersey communities of any real size agreed to merge.

Democrats gloated over the gain of one Assembly seat.

“Chris Christie is all coat and no tail,” proclaimed John Wisniewski, chairman of the New Jersey Democratic State Committee and an Assemblyman, to cheering crowds at the Bergen County Democrats’ celebration. “Chris Christie kept saying if he didn’t lose any seats, this would be an historic election for Republicans. Well, there’s one more Democrat going to Trenton.”

Christie tried to set low expectations for the Republicans’ chances, saying governors almost always lose seats in midterm elections.

Ben Dworkin, director of the Rebovich Institute for New Jersey Politics at Rider University, said the circumstances this year were vastly different.

“It is a very disappointing night for Gov. Christie,” said Dworkin, adding the GOP should have gained as many as six seats. “He outraised the Democrats by millions of dollars. He put his high approval rating and his personal reputation on the line by going on network television in New York and Philadelphia. And in the end, he wasn’t able to even keep the status quo in the legislature, much less win the several seats that Republicans might have expected given his efforts.”

When the state legislative seats top the ballot, turnout in New Jersey’s midterm elections is notoriously low. In 2007, the last time the Senate led the ballot, 32 percent of voters turned out statewide. Most counties reported voter turnout hovering between 20 and 30 percent — Cape May had a high of 38 percent — despite a beautifully warm, sunny day.

Although most voters don’t see these races as important, the stakes were high.

With a 24-16 majority in the Senate, the Democrats went into the night only three seats shy of a veto-proof majority in the upper house. They needed those 27 votes back in July when they sought to override Gov. Chris Christie’s line-item vetoes of more than a dozen spending items cut from the state budget. They didn’t think that would happen and, at least, defended all their seats.

However, if the Republicans could pick up five seats, a scenario most saw as unlikely, they would give Christie at least one house to help advance his agenda.

Continue reading … Here

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Filed under consolidation of services, election results, Gov. Chris Christie, Middletown, Monmouth County, NJ election results, NJspotlight, Princeton Boro, Princeton Township, State Legislative Races

Clean sweep for Republicans in Legislative and County Races in Monmouth

Besides being an other tough election night in Middletown it was also a tough night for Democratic candidates that were running in the 11th, 12th and 13th Legislative Districts as well as Monmouth County.

The Teams of Santiago, Gopal & Horigan (11th), Brown, Spedding & Rome (12th) and Cullen, Lavan & Short(13th), Morlino, Klienhendler & O’Rourke (30th) as well as, Monmouth County Freeholder Amy Mallet, her running mate Bill Shea and Surrogate candidate Michael Steinhorn all lost their respective races.
The big upsets out of this bunch needless to say, are the losses of Amy Mallet and Vin Gopal who both gained the endorsements of the Asbury Park Press.
Mallet presence on the Board of Chosen Freeholders will be missed. She was responsible for spear heading the effort to create the County’s Department of Veterans Affairs (at no cost to tax payers), the County’s solar initiative and was a leading voice for the ouster of the Brookdale trustees who where responsible for giving such lavish perks and contract to former Brookdale President Peter Burnham. Mallet was also an advocate for term limits for appointees of various boards and commissions through out the County so that abuses like the one discovered at Brookdale would not be repeated elsewhere.
After picking up the endorsement of the Asbury Park Press expectations skyrocketed for Vin Gopal to wrestle 1 of the 2 available Assembly seats away from the incumbent Republicans. The Republicans thought that Gopal’s election to the Assembly was such a strong possibility, they resorted to an all out personal attack on him by sending out inflammatory and totally misleading campaign material about him that both the Newark Star Ledger and the Asbury Park Press condemned as dirty and false.
Below are the official results of each race from the Monmouth County Clerks webpage:
11th District Senate
REP – Jennifer Beck 20,156 – 56.59%
DEM – Raymond Santiago 15,419 – 43.29%

11th District Assembly
REP – Mary Pat Angelini 18,420 26.39%
REP – Caroline Casagrande 18,679 26.76%
DEM – Vin Gopal 15,333 21.97%
DEM – Kathleen Horgan 15,000 21.49%
– Daniel Jacobson 2,340 3.35%

12th District Senate
REP – Samuel D. Thompson 6,089 59.20%
DEM – Robert ‘Bob’ Brown 4,182 40.66%
12th District Assembly
REP – Ronald S. Dancer 6,155 30.27%
REP – Robert D. Clifton 6,090 29.95%
DEM – William ‘Bill’ Spedding 3,995 19.65%
DEM – Catherine Tinney Rome 4,076 20.05%
13th District Senate
REP – Joe Kyrillos, Jr. 24,041 59.89%
DEM – Christopher G. Cullen 14,739 36.72%
– Karen Anne Zaletel 515 1.28%
– Stephen J. Boracchia 554 1.38%
– MacDara F. Lyden 257 0.64%
13th District Assembly
REP – Amy H. Handlin 23,993 30.49%
REP – Declan O’Scanlon 22,685 28.82%
DEM – Kevin M. Lavan 15,118 19.21%
DEM – Patrick Short 15,286 19.42%
– Frank C. Cottone 830 1.05%
– William H. Lawton 751 0.95%
30th District Senate
REP – Robert W. Singer 12,991 63.58%
DEM – Steve Morlino 7,419 36.31%
30th District Assembly
REP – Sean T. Kean 14,058 34.22%
REP – David P. Rible 12,704 30.92%
DEM – Howard Kleinhendler 6,451 15.70%
DEM – Shaun O’Rourke 7,112 17.31%
– David Schneck 729 1.77%
Monmouth County Freeholder
REP – Gary Rich 54,979 26.60%
REP – Lillian G. Burry 54,969 26.59%
DEM – Amy Mallet 46,413 22.45%
DEM – William Shea 43,457 21.02%
– Thomas Markowski 5,418 2.62%
– Patrick Noble 1,389 0.67%
Monmouth County Surrogate
REP – Rosemarie D. Peters 62,108 60.23%
DEM – Michael Steinhorn 40,894 39.65%
Write-In 124 0.12%

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Filed under 11th Legislative District, 12th Legislative District, 13th Legislative District, 30th Legislative District, Amy Mallet, Bill Shea, election results, Monmouth County, monmouth County Surrogate

Star Ledger’s Truth-o-Meter Says GOP Attack Ad Against Gopal In Assembly District 11 Race = Pants On Fire !

The Star Ledger broke out the Politifacts Truth-o-Meter and has chimed in on the controversial GOP attack ad against 11th District Assembly candidate Vin Gopal.

Politifacts has determined that the attack ad sent to thousands of residents in the the 11th district is a clear case of Pants-on-Fire deceit and called this dirty tactic to discredit their opponent “utter filth”

Here is what they had to say:

Dirty politics is nothing new in the art of campaigning, especially in the final days running up to an election.

But sometimes, those dirty tactics reach the point of utter filth.

Take the case of an attack ad by the New Jersey Republican State Committee against 11th District Assembly candidate Vin Gopal. Democrats Gopal and Kathleen Horgan are challenging Republican incumbents Caroline Casagrande and Mary Pat Angelini for the seats to represent parts of Monmouth County.

“Corrupt Political Bosses. Money Laundering. Fraud. It’s Just Another Day At The Office For Vin Gopal,” reads a campaign mailer circulating in the district.

The ad shows a $100 bill hanging from a clothesline and features Star-Ledger headlines from articles about former Assemblyman Joseph Vas, who was sentenced to 6 ½ years in prison for stealing affordable housing funds when he was Perth Amboy’s mayor and for committing federal election fraud. From February to June 2006 — when he was a 20-year-old political science student — Gopal was a campaign manager for Vas during his primary campaign for congress. The ad also shows a washing machine with money inside and a statement below it that reads “To you, this might look like someone illegally laundering money … To Vin Gopal, it looks like Pay Day!”

The ad seems to imply that Gopal had a connection to Vas and his criminal activities, but does not accuse Gopal of any criminal act.

PolitiFact New Jersey found that readers of the ad could infer improprieties by Gopal, but there’s no proof that he did anything wrong.

One of the article headlines shown in the ad reads “Aide to former Perth Amboy Mayor Joseph Vas pleads guilty to money laundering.”

Gopal, a Long Branch resident and business owner, said what bothers him most about the ad “is the implying and lying that I was that aide.”

We pulled the Star-Ledger article and found that the aide in question was Raymond Geneske, who was a campaign adviser to Vas. Geneske was sentenced in January to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $10,000 fine for participating in a scheme to funnel contributions to Vas’s congressional campaign. Gopal, who told us that he was never contacted by any law enforcement agency or official about Vas, is not mentioned in the article.

We checked further by running Gopal’s name through the Public Access to Court Electronic Records database covering federal courts and bankruptcies and found that he was never charged with a crime. The Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office said it had never heard of Gopal and the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office confirmed that Gopal had no connection to the Vas case.

“The (Republican) State Committee is not suggesting Mr. Gopal committed a crime,” Communications Director Rick Gorka said in an email. “Rather, it is suggesting that he had a front row seat for the corruption that plagues New Jersey’s political process. The fact is, Mr. Gopal, a career political operative, was the campaign manager of Vas for Congress, a campaign of a sitting State Legislator who was at the center of federal and state corruption investigations and charges. He was paid from Joe Vas’s campaign account.

“Indeed, as the campaign manager he was presumably responsible for expenditures from that account,” Gorka continued. “If he didn’t know where the money was coming from, he should have. In the past he has been proud of his association with that campaign, touting it in his bio when he was deputy campaign manager for the short-live Kucinich for President Campaign. Now he’s seeking to run away from it. The State Committee thinks the voters have a right to know about Vin Gopal’s connections to those sordid events.”

A “career political operative?”

Gopal, 26, became involved with the Vas campaign when he was a 20-year-old student at Pennsylvania State University majoring in political science and wanted to work on a campaign for class credit and to gain experience in politics. Gopal told us he applied to 20 campaigns and eventually went to work as a campaign manager for the Vas campaign. He had also worked on other campaigns. Vlad Gutman, campaign manager for the District 11 Democrats, said that although Gopal had the title of campaign manager with Vas, he managed no personnel and “was the most junior position” on staff.

“I would talk to the press briefly about events he (Vas) would do in a day, set up phones, work with volunteers, handle scheduling,” Gopal said of his responsibilities. “I never had anything to do with money, never saw money, never was at any fundraisers.”

Gopal said he learned about the case against Vas when he saw a newspaper article about it two years after leaving the campaign, and attributes the current spate of attack ads to what he called “desperation.”

“The things they’re doing are borderline slanderous,” Gopal said. “It’s unethical. They’re lying and misleading the public in every way possible to hide their failed actions in this district.”

Our ruling

The Republican state committee distributed an ad in the 11th Assembly District that links Gopal to Vas, a disgraced politician convicted of election fraud and other offenses. Gopal worked four months on Vas’ unsuccessful congressional campaign. Gopal dealt with scheduling, phone banks, volunteers and occasional media queries. Given that law enforcement and a public database all confirm that Gopal had no connection of any kind to the Vas criminal case, the implications made by the ad aren’t just ridiculous, they’re also outrageous. Some laundering is definitely needed because this claim is Pants on Fire!

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Filed under 11th Legislative District, Democratic Candidate, Joseph Vas, Monmouth County, pants on fire, Perth Amboy, politifacts, the Star-Ledger, Vin Gopal

NJ Watchdog: THE “GOLDEN” AGE OF DOUBLE-DIPPING IN MONMOUTH COUNTY

NJ Watchdog yesterday posted a follow-up to it’s story “43 TOP NJ COUNTY COPS DO THE BIG DOUBLE-DIP: HOW 16 SHERIFFS & 27 UNDERSHERIFFS POCKET MILLIONS IN PENSIONS PLUS SALARIES” by investigative reporter Mark Lagerkvist, which I posted about back in September.

The update titled “THE “GOLDEN” AGE OF DOUBLE-DIPPING IN MONMOUTH COUNTY” details the abuses of the Monmouth County Sheriffs Department and specifically names both former Monmouth County Sheriffs Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno and current Sheriff Shaun Golden, as being complacent in the hiring of and promotions of 3 current Monmouth County Undersheriff who all are politically connected, retired from well paying state jobs and started collecting their pensions, then were hired to work for the Sheriffs Department.

This practice of complacently allowing Double-Dipping by in Monmouth County by our current and former Sherriffs is even more disturbing when you consider that they have been rewarded for their actions, Guadagno going on to become Lt. Governor and Golden recently being named as Secretary of the statewide organization the Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey (COANJ), which is a nearly century-old professional organization of the elected constitutional officers of all 21 counties who’s membership includes Sheriffs, County Surrogates, County Clerks, and Registers of Deeds and Mortgages.

Why do the Monmouth County Freeholders allow this abuse of tax payer dollars to go on?

Below is an excerpt from NJ Watchdogs update:

Three of Monmouth County Sheriff Shaun Golden’s undersheriffs are guilty of double-dipping – not a felony or misdemeanor, just a costly reality in the world of New Jersey politics.

The most controversial of the three is Undersheriff Michael W. Donovan Jr. Donovan’s double-dipping – revealed by a New Jersey Watchdog investigative report last year

As Monmouth County sheriff in 2008, Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno hired Donovan as chief in charge of law enforcement. There was an obstacle: Donovan had retired as a county investigator three years earlier. Since a sheriff’s chief officer is a position subject to the rules of the Police and Firemen’s Retirement System (PFRS), Donovan faced the prospect of giving up pension checks by going back to work.

To help Donovan double-dip, Guadagno informed payroll officials Donovan was her chief warrant officer – a similar sounding but completely different position not subject to PFRS rules. In contrast, Guadagno’s own memo and organizational chart identified Donovan as her chief in charge of law enforcement.

With Guadagno’s help, Donovan pocketed $85,000 a year in retirement pay along with his new salary of $87,000. He scammed $245,000 from PFRS – $227,000 in pension pay, plus $18,000 he should have contributed to the pension fund after being re-hired.

Faced with controversy, Sheriff Shaun Golden – Guadagno’s successor – found a way to protect his office and Donovan. In February, Golden gave Donovan a raise and promoted him to undersheriff, a position not subject to PFRS rules. So Donovan continues his double-dipping ways, more lucrative than ever…..

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Filed under double dipping, Kim Guadagono, Monmouth County, Monmouth County Sheriff, New Jersey Watchdog, Shaun Golden