Category Archives: NAACP

MoreMonmouthMusings’s Art Gallagher Arrest; Awaiting Extradition To Delaware On Fraud Charges

According to an online article posted on The Asbury Park Press this evening, Art Gallagher, author of the moremonmouthmusings blog, has been arrest on fraud charges and is being held on $250,000 bail while waiting on extradition to Delaware, at the Monmouth County Jail.

From the APP:

HIGHLANDS — A prominent blogger who is running for a seat on the Highlands Borough Council next month is in Monmouth County Jail awaiting extradition to Delaware, police said.

Art Gallagher, who runs a Republican-leaning political blog and is campaigning as an independent for council, was arrested over the weekend by borough police on a fugitive from justice warrant out of Delaware, Chief Joseph Blewitt said.

Details of Gallagher’s alleged crime across state lines are unclear, but Blewitt said the warrant was theft-related. Detective Nicholas Terranova, the lead investigator in the case for Delaware State Police, could not be reached for comment Sunday.

“That’s what it’s stemming from. It’s regarding a fraud investigation Delaware State Police conducted,” Highlands police Sgt. Joe Rogers said.

Gallagher, 53, who is also a member of the borough’s planning board, is being held on $250,000 bail. Blewitt said on Sunday afternoon “they have informed us they will extradite.”

I don’t want to kick a guy while he’s down but sooner or later everyone needs to answer to a higher authority for what they may have reaped in life. I hope that he and his family will able to cope well during this trying time.
Something like this however was bound to happen sooner or later to Art. I heard rumors last year that Art was going to be the subject of a WPIX News segment of “Help Me Howard “.
For those unfamiliar with “Help Me Howard”, it’s a segment on channel 11 news that features longtime newsman Howard Thompson. Thompson helps those who feel they have suffered injustices or have been wronged in someway.
In a segment that was to feature Art Gallagher but never aired because the incident was allegedly settled before airing, Art was accused by someone who had rented a food vending truck from his business. I don’t remember all the details but the person who rented the truck was upset that the truck didn’t work properly and wanted a refund of some kind. Art of course wouldn’t oblige so the individual contacted Howard Thompson.
Also, Art has fancied himself a “King Maker” of sorts ever since he started MoreMonmouthMusings, blogging first anonymously as William Seward, then as himself, after he and others managed to air all sorts of Republican dirty laundry and the “take down” of Monmouth County Chairman Adam Puharic back in 2008 when he resigned from the position and opened the door for current Chairman Joe Oxley.
Art has since often warned Republican wannabes that if they want to get elected to office in Monmouth County or locally that they need to indulge his blogging and submit comments or columns to it.
Art also got himself in a bit of hot water back in 2008 when he tried to rationalize the use of the “N” word after the Reverend Jesse Jackson was caught on an open mike threatening to cut of then presidential candidate Barack Obama’s “N”nuts. Art wanted to know why it was okay for Jesse Jackson, a black man, to use the “N” word but it was unacceptable for a white man to use the term.
After posting this on his blog, then Middletown Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger, called a special emergency session of the Middletown Human Rights Commission to look into it thinking that his blog posting was actually printed in the Bayshore Courier where Art had at the time wrote a weekly column.
This lead to Art being censored by the local chapter of the NAACP and his column being dropped by the Courier. Afterwards Gallagher started a vendetta against the Middletown Democrats and the Courier’s publisher, blaming them for somehow conspiring against him and having him labeled as a racist.
Since then, Gallagher’s blog has become a the Middletown Republican’s dumping ground for the dirty tricks, mudslinging and slander against Democratic candidates running for office in Middletown.
What will the Middletown Republicans do now? Will they come out and disavow Art Gallagher or will they make excuses for him and their actions.
As I said above, it is easy to kick a guy while he is down. Regardless of Art’s alleged actions in this case or in the past, I do wish him and his family well. We have had a slight adversarial relationship over the past few years but I think we have always been respectful to one another.
I may not always agree with Art or his point of view but that doesn’t mean I wish him any ill will. I wish him a speedy resolve to his problems and a return to his blogging.

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Filed under "N" word, arrested, Art Gallaher, Asbury Park Press, blogging, Delaware, extradition, fraud, help me howard, MoreMonmouthMusings, NAACP, The Courier

>Policer Officer Files Bias Complaint Against MiddletownChief and Range Master

>This past Tuesday, June 7th, word started spreading that Middletown Policer Officer Darrin Simon, an African-American, had filed in state Superior Court last month against Middletown, Middletown Police Chief Robert Oches and range master James Griffin, a law suit claiming racial bias.

The law suit claims that over a period of time Officer Simon had been on the receiving end of various racial slurs and being called “boy” and “coon” by range master Griffin and that Chief Oches may have attempted to to cover the incidents up.

Both the Asbury Park Press and Red Bank Green both have stories online about the filed complaint and should be read for more details.

What the two articles have failed to mention however and was not generally known at the moment, but has come to my attention since, is that another law suit related to this case has been filed on the behalf of Officer Simon by the Greater Long Branch chapter of the NAACP.
More later….

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Filed under Asbury Park Press, law suit, Middletown Police, NAACP, racial bias, racially-tinged term, RedBankGreen.com

>NAACP: We Are 100

>By NAACP President and CEO Benjamin T. Jealous

February 12, 2009

One hundred years ago, a small multiracial group of progressive thinkers dared to come together in a tiny New York apartment to share a bold dream: An America free of the racial oppression that sullied the soul of our nation a little over 40 years after slavery. The NAACP was born of that noble vision advanced by such visionary thinkers as Ida B. Wells, Mary White Ovington and W.E.B. Dubois. The new organization, radical for its time, launched a tenacious three decade long struggle to successfully end the horror of lynch mobs. In 1932, we took up the mantle to reverse the destructive, segregating vestiges of Jim Crow, and two decades later, segregation was made illegal. In the 1960’s, a determined effort for economic and political inclusion was initiated that triumphed last year in the election of an African-American president and the most black elected officials since Reconstruction.

The election of President Barack Obama reflects a seminal transformation within the American psyche. Overcoming the limitations of our history fraught with the wrenching divisions of race, a majority of voters embraced our country’s promise – crossing racial, cultural and generational boundaries to set a remarkable example for the world. Yet there is a dichotomy between the symbol of hope and racial progress of Obama’s election and the entrenched realties of our painful racial legacy. While the country has allowed individuals to permeate the barriers of discrimination, entire groups of people still are locked out of the American dream because of race.

The NAACP has always embraced the impossible, fearlessly marching forward at an unwavering pace. Our triumphs have not been ours alone. Ending lynch mobs against African Americans ended the horror for White Catholics, the second largest group of victims. Our fight against discrimination helped all disenfranchised members of our country open locked doors and break through barriers of inequity.

But the journey is not over. Black unemployment is perennially twice that of white Americans. Several studies found that a majority of employers preferred to hire a white criminal than a black man without a criminal record. African American children disproportionately attend segregated, poor quality schools. Mass incarceration is harming far too many people of color when drug treatment and other approaches would have better outcomes. The health disparities in our communities are well-known.

Now as we face our second centennial, we can begin to see the realization of the vision of a new land where all live in safe communities and law enforcement respects and protects our neighborhoods. A land where all children can blossom in a quality school; their potential nurtured and cherished. Where every worker in America has a fair chance for employment, education and advancement. The journey is born anew this year and just as in the past we had the courage to pursue the impossible dream that doubters insisted was illusory , today we will begin again to be fearless as we resolutely move towards a better tomorrow for us all.

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Filed under Benijamin T. Jealous, NAACP, race and politics, Race Relations

NAACP: We Are 100

By NAACP President and CEO Benjamin T. Jealous

February 12, 2009

One hundred years ago, a small multiracial group of progressive thinkers dared to come together in a tiny New York apartment to share a bold dream: An America free of the racial oppression that sullied the soul of our nation a little over 40 years after slavery. The NAACP was born of that noble vision advanced by such visionary thinkers as Ida B. Wells, Mary White Ovington and W.E.B. Dubois. The new organization, radical for its time, launched a tenacious three decade long struggle to successfully end the horror of lynch mobs. In 1932, we took up the mantle to reverse the destructive, segregating vestiges of Jim Crow, and two decades later, segregation was made illegal. In the 1960’s, a determined effort for economic and political inclusion was initiated that triumphed last year in the election of an African-American president and the most black elected officials since Reconstruction.

The election of President Barack Obama reflects a seminal transformation within the American psyche. Overcoming the limitations of our history fraught with the wrenching divisions of race, a majority of voters embraced our country’s promise – crossing racial, cultural and generational boundaries to set a remarkable example for the world. Yet there is a dichotomy between the symbol of hope and racial progress of Obama’s election and the entrenched realties of our painful racial legacy. While the country has allowed individuals to permeate the barriers of discrimination, entire groups of people still are locked out of the American dream because of race.

The NAACP has always embraced the impossible, fearlessly marching forward at an unwavering pace. Our triumphs have not been ours alone. Ending lynch mobs against African Americans ended the horror for White Catholics, the second largest group of victims. Our fight against discrimination helped all disenfranchised members of our country open locked doors and break through barriers of inequity.

But the journey is not over. Black unemployment is perennially twice that of white Americans. Several studies found that a majority of employers preferred to hire a white criminal than a black man without a criminal record. African American children disproportionately attend segregated, poor quality schools. Mass incarceration is harming far too many people of color when drug treatment and other approaches would have better outcomes. The health disparities in our communities are well-known.

Now as we face our second centennial, we can begin to see the realization of the vision of a new land where all live in safe communities and law enforcement respects and protects our neighborhoods. A land where all children can blossom in a quality school; their potential nurtured and cherished. Where every worker in America has a fair chance for employment, education and advancement. The journey is born anew this year and just as in the past we had the courage to pursue the impossible dream that doubters insisted was illusory , today we will begin again to be fearless as we resolutely move towards a better tomorrow for us all.

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Filed under Benijamin T. Jealous, NAACP, race and politics, Race Relations

Middletown’s Mayor calls for Human Rights Commission to meet about "N" word controversy

Middletown’s Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger asked the Middletown Human Rights Commission to hold a special meeting last night to discuss the controversy surrounding Art Gallagher and his blog, MoreMonmouthMusings’s sloppy attempt at race relations.

I arrived at Town Hall late and unfortunately had to leave early due to family concerns, but I that the Human Rights Commission was shocked and appalled at what it heard from the meeting attendees. 
In attendance was Lorenzo “Bill” Dangler, President of Long Branch chapter of the NAACP, who wanted to make it clear that under no circumstances what so ever would it be appropriate to say the “N” word and that Gallagher’s words were offensive and hurtful. 
From what I understand the Commission will make a report  condemning Art Gallagher and his blog for his ill conceived attempt to address the use of the “N” word and race relations. The Commission will then present  a recommendation to the Mayor which would ask him to denounce Art and his MoreMonmouthMusings blog. 
The meeting was also covered by the Courier’s Melissa Gaffney so I am sure that you will be able get a better idea of what exactly happened at the meeting by reading about it in the Courier or by reading her SableMinded blog shortly.

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Filed under "N" word, Art Gallaher, Lorenzo Dangler, Mayor Scharfenberger, Middletown Human Rights Commission, MoreMonmouthMusings, NAACP

>Middletown’s Mayor calls for Human Rights Commission to meet about "N" word controversy

>Middletown’s Mayor Gerry Scharfenberger asked the Middletown Human Rights Commission to hold a special meeting last night to discuss the controversy surrounding Art Gallagher and his blog, MoreMonmouthMusings’s sloppy attempt at race relations.

I arrived at Town Hall late and unfortunately had to leave early due to family concerns, but I that the Human Rights Commission was shocked and appalled at what it heard from the meeting attendees. 
In attendance was Lorenzo “Bill” Dangler, President of Long Branch chapter of the NAACP, who wanted to make it clear that under no circumstances what so ever would it be appropriate to say the “N” word and that Gallagher’s words were offensive and hurtful. 
From what I understand the Commission will make a report  condemning Art Gallagher and his blog for his ill conceived attempt to address the use of the “N” word and race relations. The Commission will then present  a recommendation to the Mayor which would ask him to denounce Art and his MoreMonmouthMusings blog. 
The meeting was also covered by the Courier’s Melissa Gaffney so I am sure that you will be able get a better idea of what exactly happened at the meeting by reading about it in the Courier or by reading her SableMinded blog shortly.

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Filed under "N" word, Art Gallaher, Lorenzo Dangler, Mayor Scharfenberger, Middletown Human Rights Commission, MoreMonmouthMusings, NAACP