Category Archives: NY Times

Gary Carter, Hall of Fame Catcher and Mets Star, Dies at 57

From the New York Times:
Gary Carter, the slugging catcher known as Kid for the sheer joy he took in playing baseball, who entered the Hall of Fame as a Montreal Expo but who most famously helped propel the Mets to their dramatic 1986 World Series championship, died Thursday. He was 57.

The cause was brain cancer, which had been diagnosed last May.

Read More:
http://www.nytimes.com/?emc=na

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Filed under brain cancer, Gary Carter, NY Mets, NY Times, The Kids

Economic Growth Gives Lift to Obama in NYT/CBS Poll

Good news for supporters of President Obama his job approval rating has been going up steadily as the economy has been improving.

From the New York Times

President Obama’s political standing is rising along with voters’ optimism that the economy is getting better, according to the latest New York Times/CBS News poll, a shift that coincides with continued Republican disquiet over the field of candidates seeking to replace him.

Read more about it … Here

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Filed under economy, job approval, NY Times, NYT/CBS Poll, Polls, President Obama

U.S. Economy Added 243,000 Jobs in January; Unemployment Dips to 8.3%

Here’s a little good news that should brighten your weekend from the New York Times.

The U.S. Economy Added 243,000 Jobs in January; Unemployment Dips to 8.3%

The United States economy gained momentum in January, adding 243,000 jobs, the second straight month of better-than-expected gains, the Labor Department reported on Friday. The unemployment rate fell to 8.3 percent. The promising jobs numbers came as various economic indicators have painted an ambivalent picture of the recovery’s strength.

You can read all about today in the NY Times

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Demand Progress and its million-plus members declare victory — encourage Americans to "Vote for the Net"

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: David Moon, (202) 427-7966 and Moon@DemandProgress.org


WASHINGTON – Today, progressive Internet advocacy group Demand Progress declared victory over the Internet Blacklist Bills (aka PIPA & SOPA). After a year-long battle with civil liberties, human rights, and Internet freedom advocacy organizations and their members, U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid cancelled a planned January 24th procedural vote on the bill. During the conflict, Demand Progress grew its membership list from zero to over one million members, and generated more than 3 million contacts to Congress.

Demand Progress encouraged Internet users to visit its new site, VoteForTheNet.com, where voters can pledge to oppose censorship supporters, and can donate to the four senators who’ve long promised to filibuster PIPA and SOPA. The site is a joint partnership with the right-leaning organization, DontCensorTheNet — More than 70,000 Americans have signed the pledge in the last 72 hours.

Demand Progress Executive Director David Segal stated, “Today Internet users around the world have reason to celebrate. The battle over PIPA and SOPA will go down in history as a turning point in the battle to keep the Internet free from undue corporate and government control. But mark my words — this is just the beginning. We can never allow dangerous legislation like PIPA and SOPA to move forward in any form: After the year of back-room deals that led to the drafting and near-passage of these bills, nothing less than complete transparency throughout any legislative process — with the input of Internet users — will be acceptable.”

Segal pointed to MPAA Chairman Chris Dodd’s comments in today’s New York Times: “No Washington player can safely assume that a … heavily financed legislative program is safe from a sudden burst of Web-driven populism” http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/20/technology/dodd-calls-for-hollywood-and-silicon-valley-to-meet.html?_r=2&ref=business

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Filed under Demand Progress, Internet censorship, internet piracy, NY Times, PIPA, press release, SOPA, Stop Online Piracy Act(SOPA)

Countless Web Companies And Advocacy Groups Gear Up To Kill The Stop Online Piracy Act This Week

For Immediate Release:

Contacts:
David Segal, David@DemandProgress.org and (401) 499-5991
David Moon, Moon@DemandProgress.org and (202) 427-7966

Aim to drive hundreds of thousands of constituent contacts to Congress before House vote on SOPA; Encourage the whole web to take part

Washington, DC — More than 70 tech firms from across the web and advocacy groups from across the political spectrum asking urging their users and members to contact Congress and urge members to oppose the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). SOPA is scheduled for a vote in the House Judiciary Committee this Thursday at 10AM.

Internet users can contact Congress by visiting AmericanCensorship.org. To give Americans a sense of what the Internet would be like if SOPA passes, any Internet user can use a tool there to “censor” parts of their emails and posts to Twitter, Facebook, blogs, or other websites. To ‘uncensor’ the post, their friends and readers must visit AmericanCensorship.org and contact their own members of Congress. Here’s a sample ‘censored’ post.


To underscore the negative impact SOPA would have on economic growth and innovation, people who are employed by web-related companies — and people who earn income blogging, selling items online, or otherwise make a living by using the Internet — are encouraged to post photos of themselves to IWorkForTheInternet.org. Just a few hours after the site’s launch last evening, more than 1,000 people had done so.

SOPA would kill tech jobs and stifle innovation, undermine cybersecurity, censor the Internet in America, and give comfort to foreign regimes that seek to censor the Internet in order to undermine political speech and dissent. If it passes, social networking sites would need to police their users’ content more aggressively, sites would be shut down with negligible due process, and people could be jailed for posting copyrighted content (like background music and karaoke videos). This New York Times op-ed serves as a good primer on the bill’s failings.

According to Demand Progress executive director David Segal, “This week is do or die: If SOPA passes through committee, House leadership can call for a full vote at any time. But if we can beat it this week, there’s a good chance it’ll be gone for good. Anybody who cherishes a free, secure Internet — and the economic development and benefit to our democracy that come with it — needs to call Congress right away.”

Participating sites include Tumblr, Reddit, Mozilla, Union Square Ventures, Fight for the Future, Demand Progress, Public Knowledge, MoveOn, Free Press, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Wikimedia, the Free Software Foundation, the Center for Democracy and Technology, and dozens of others. They include the groups that drove more than two million contacts to Congress through last month’s “American Censorship Day” effort, and many more.


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Filed under Congress, Demand Progress, Internet censorship, NY Times, Stop Online Piracy Act(SOPA), tech jobs, the Internet

>The GOP’s "Environmental Wish List" is Horrifying

>The following appeared over at the environmentally conscientious blog treehugger.com, it’s an eye-opener for anyone that believes the environment is important and think that the GOP will stand behind their cause:

Unless you’ve been hiding in a cave — or perhaps a lavish, sealed-off compound — for the last few months, you’re likely fully aware that the GOP is in full-bore Tea Partying mode. Which means ultra-anti-regulatory sentiment and pro-corporate cheer-leading rule the day. Man, that was a lot of hyphens. Anyhow, Republicans have seized their moment in the sun to pursue a bill known as the 3-D Act (Domestic Jobs, Domestic Energy and Deficit Reduction). It’s essentially what the New York Times calls “the right’s environmental wish list” — a series of 12 initiatives that include gutting the Clean Air Act, opening up pristine lands for drilling, and trampling the Endangered Species Act.

Here’s the abridged “wish list” from the NY Times, and my response to each entry:

1. Put oil and natural gas leasing on the Outer Continental shelf on a fast track, holding lease sales every nine months and making them dependent on commercial expressions of interest (rather than, say, ecosystem requirements) to determine what parcels should be leased. Ensure that a year after the bill becomes law, there will be three lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico and one off the coast of Virginia.

In other words, this would put oil interests first and make ecological considerations near-obsolete. It would also mean much more drilling in the Gulf and off the East Coast.

2. Open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to an “environmentally sound program for the exploration, development and production of the oil and gas resources …”

Republicans have been after this for years, but there’s a reason they haven’t gotten it: Cleaning up oil spills in the Arctic, as we saw with the Exxon Valdez, is excruciatingly difficult — and spills therefore do immense damage to the native habitats and local economies.

3. Expedite lease sales for companies seeking to extract oil and natural gas from complex geologic formations like oil shale and tar sands in the West.

The GOP wants to bring the devastatingly destructive tar sands operation like the one in Alberta, Canada, to the United States. Remember, that operation produces what is considered the “dirtiest fuel on earth”.

4. Set a nine-month deadline for the environmental review of any federal action like such leasing.

Read: less talk, more drilling.

Continue read >>>> Here

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Filed under NY Times, the environment, the GOP, Treehugger.com

>NY Times: Gov. Christie Abandons a Good Idea

>The following editorial was published yesterday in the NY Times, people should read it before falling for his claim to be an advocate for the environment:

Running for governor in 2009, Chris Christie vowed to become “New Jersey’s No. 1 clean-energy advocate.” That was a hollow promise. As governor, Mr. Christie proceeded to cut all the money for the Office of Climate and Energy. He raided $158 million from the clean energy fund, meant for alternative energy investments, and spent it on general programs. He withdrew the state from an important lawsuit against electric utilities to reduce emissions.

On Thursday, he took the worst step of all: He abandoned the 10-state initiative in the Northeast that uses a cap-and-trade system to lower carbon-dioxide emissions from power plants. The program has been remarkably successful, a model of vision and fortitude. Lacking that, Mr. Christie has given in to the corporate and Tea Party interests that revile all forms of cap and trade, letting down the other nine states trying to fight climate change.

The system works by requiring utilities to either lower their emissions or buy allowances to pollute. Money from the allowances goes to states for clean-energy programs. Since it began in 2008, the system has created more than $700 million for these programs; New Jersey has spent some of its share on helping cities become more energy-efficient. Greenhouse emissions from power plants in the region went down about 12 percent from 2008 to 2010 for many reasons, including lower natural gas prices. Programs like the regional initiative are estimated to have produced more than 10 percent of that decline.

Mr. Christie has already demonstrated his disdain for the program’s goals by spending $65 million of the state’s $100 million share from the allowances to pay down New Jersey’s deficit. He claimed this week that the program was not working, a notion that was quickly refuted by five other governors. “Governor Christie is simply wrong when he claims that these efforts are a failure,” said Gov. Martin O’Malley of Maryland. He said they had an equivalent effect of taking 3,500 cars off the road in his state.

For now, at least, the far right has killed cap and trade nationally, but the idea is far from dead. Several Western states are gearing up for a cap-and-trade program; California has been particularly aggressive. The Northeast state compact will survive Mr. Christie’s exit. It is New Jersey that will be the poorer, with less to invest in smarter energy programs, more carbon dioxide and a leadership vacancy at its helm.

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Filed under cap and trade, carbon dioxide emissions, clean energy, editorial, Gov. Chris Christie, greenhouse gasses, New Jersey, NY Times, Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative.