Category Archives: Vice-President debate

Bush’s clone wears a skirt

Countdown’s Keith Olbermann aired a video compilation showing the similarity in rhetoric between George W. Bush in 2000 and Sarah Palin in 2008.  Olbermann reported that “the people around [Palin] — the top-level campaign staffers crafting her message of change and reform — are almost all from the inner-circle of the same Bush campaigns and administration from which she offers that change.” He concluded, “Small surprise then that even in the very act of claiming her background, her experience qualify her to offer us that change from Bush, she does so sounding almost exactly like Bush.”

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Filed under Countdown with Keith Olberman, George Bush, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate

Bush’s clone wears a skirt

Countdown’s Keith Olbermann aired a video compilation showing the similarity in rhetoric between George W. Bush in 2000 and Sarah Palin in 2008.  Olbermann reported that “the people around [Palin] — the top-level campaign staffers crafting her message of change and reform — are almost all from the inner-circle of the same Bush campaigns and administration from which she offers that change.” He concluded, “Small surprise then that even in the very act of claiming her background, her experience qualify her to offer us that change from Bush, she does so sounding almost exactly like Bush.”

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Filed under Countdown with Keith Olberman, George Bush, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate

Debate Wrap-up

Biden Won, Because He Made Forceful Case Against McCain.

Greg Sargent of Talking Points Memo wraps up last nights debate between Joe Biden and Sarah Palin pretty well and I agree with him. 
“Many people will analyze this debate by asking whether Sarah Palin outdid her previous disastrous interview performances, and hence proved she just might have the mettle to be a Vice President, after all.

But a better way to decide who “won” tonight is this: Which Veep candidate most forcefully made the case against the opposing presidential candidate?

By that standard, the winner by that measure was unquestionably Joe Biden. He made a far stronger case against John McCain than Sarah Palin did against Barack Obama. It wasn’t even close.

Tellingly, Biden was the first to target the other ticket’s presidential candidate, laying into McCain over his “fundamentals of the economy” gaffe, a core contrast point for the Obama campaign. That immediately forced Palin to go on the defensive — in the context of a discussion of the presidential candidates — which she did with the silly argument that McCain’s “fundamentals” line was a reference to American workers.

Biden also drew a devastatingly sharp contrast between Obama and McCain on Iraq. While Biden admittedly wasn’t at his best at times during the first half, when the debate drifted onto foreign policy turf, Biden clearly found his footing, and then some. He stared right into the camera as he made the case as clearly as you could ask for.

“We’re spending $10 billion a month while the Iraqis have an $80 billion surplus. Barack says it’s time for them to spend their own money,” he said. “This is a fundamental difference between us: We will end this war. For John McCain, there is no end in sight to end this war. Fundamental difference: We will end this war.” And Biden hit a very strong riff on how McCain’s foreign policies are indistinguishable from those of George W. Bush.

To be clear, Palin did outperform in many ways tonight, and did clear a basic competence bar. She was far more in command of the material than she has been in her catastrophic interviews. And there’s no reason to doubt the reports we’re hearing about relief and even elation in Republican and conservative circles.

It’s also true that Palin did get in some blows on Obama, hitting him somewhat effectively over his willingness to meet with foreign leaders and blasting him for waving the “white flag of surrender” in Iraq.

But here’s the key: Even on those issues where Palin did score with base-pleasing hits on Obama or Biden, the unshakable reality underlying all this is that public opinion agrees with the Obama-Biden view on the core questions discussed tonight. And Biden seemed to proceed from a firm understanding of this point, articulating a big-picture contrast between Obama and McCain on the economy and on foreign policy with gusto and intensity.

That will prove far more consequential than whatever narrow success Palin had in outdoing previous expectations, and in proving her own baseline competence. And as a result — this being a race between two would be presidents, after all — the public will give this debate to Biden by sizable margins.”

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Filed under 2008 Presidential Campaign, Barack Obama, Joe Biden, John McCain, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate

>Debate Wrap-up

>Biden Won, Because He Made Forceful Case Against McCain.

Greg Sargent of Talking Points Memo wraps up last nights debate between Joe Biden and Sarah Palin pretty well and I agree with him. 
“Many people will analyze this debate by asking whether Sarah Palin outdid her previous disastrous interview performances, and hence proved she just might have the mettle to be a Vice President, after all.

But a better way to decide who “won” tonight is this: Which Veep candidate most forcefully made the case against the opposing presidential candidate?

By that standard, the winner by that measure was unquestionably Joe Biden. He made a far stronger case against John McCain than Sarah Palin did against Barack Obama. It wasn’t even close.

Tellingly, Biden was the first to target the other ticket’s presidential candidate, laying into McCain over his “fundamentals of the economy” gaffe, a core contrast point for the Obama campaign. That immediately forced Palin to go on the defensive — in the context of a discussion of the presidential candidates — which she did with the silly argument that McCain’s “fundamentals” line was a reference to American workers.

Biden also drew a devastatingly sharp contrast between Obama and McCain on Iraq. While Biden admittedly wasn’t at his best at times during the first half, when the debate drifted onto foreign policy turf, Biden clearly found his footing, and then some. He stared right into the camera as he made the case as clearly as you could ask for.

“We’re spending $10 billion a month while the Iraqis have an $80 billion surplus. Barack says it’s time for them to spend their own money,” he said. “This is a fundamental difference between us: We will end this war. For John McCain, there is no end in sight to end this war. Fundamental difference: We will end this war.” And Biden hit a very strong riff on how McCain’s foreign policies are indistinguishable from those of George W. Bush.

To be clear, Palin did outperform in many ways tonight, and did clear a basic competence bar. She was far more in command of the material than she has been in her catastrophic interviews. And there’s no reason to doubt the reports we’re hearing about relief and even elation in Republican and conservative circles.

It’s also true that Palin did get in some blows on Obama, hitting him somewhat effectively over his willingness to meet with foreign leaders and blasting him for waving the “white flag of surrender” in Iraq.

But here’s the key: Even on those issues where Palin did score with base-pleasing hits on Obama or Biden, the unshakable reality underlying all this is that public opinion agrees with the Obama-Biden view on the core questions discussed tonight. And Biden seemed to proceed from a firm understanding of this point, articulating a big-picture contrast between Obama and McCain on the economy and on foreign policy with gusto and intensity.

That will prove far more consequential than whatever narrow success Palin had in outdoing previous expectations, and in proving her own baseline competence. And as a result — this being a race between two would be presidents, after all — the public will give this debate to Biden by sizable margins.”

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Filed under 2008 Presidential Campaign, Barack Obama, Joe Biden, John McCain, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate

>My thoughts on the Biden/Palin debate

>After watching tonight’s Vice-Presidential debate between Joe Biden and Sarah Palin I have to say that I think it was a toss up with a possible slight edge to Biden.

I feel that Gov. Palin scored points for her folksiness and head strong, full speed ahead approach to the debate, while Joe Biden did a great job attacking John McCain and pointing out the differences between the two Presidential candidates.

Palin looked nervous to me at first but settled in and found her comfort zone at around the 25minute mark. Biden on the other hand started off slower and seemed like he didn’t want to come off as to arrogant or pushy. Joe Biden played it cool on a number of occasion when Sarah Palin zinged him.

As the debate went on however, Biden’s knowledge and expertise on foreign affairs had really shown through.

Under the circumstances, PBS’s Gwen Ifell did a credible job of moderating this debate. After all of the talk about her forth coming book about Barack Obama, she must have felt a need to tone down her questioning. Seldom if ever did she ask a follow-up question and she addressed both candidates to answer the same gotcha types of questions.

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Filed under Gwen Ifell, Joe Biden, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate

My thoughts on the Biden/Palin debate

After watching tonight’s Vice-Presidential debate between Joe Biden and Sarah Palin I have to say that I think it was a toss up with a possible slight edge to Biden.

I feel that Gov. Palin scored points for her folksiness and head strong, full speed ahead approach to the debate, while Joe Biden did a great job attacking John McCain and pointing out the differences between the two Presidential candidates.

Palin looked nervous to me at first but settled in and found her comfort zone at around the 25minute mark. Biden on the other hand started off slower and seemed like he didn’t want to come off as to arrogant or pushy. Joe Biden played it cool on a number of occasion when Sarah Palin zinged him.

As the debate went on however, Biden’s knowledge and expertise on foreign affairs had really shown through.

Under the circumstances, PBS’s Gwen Ifell did a credible job of moderating this debate. After all of the talk about her forth coming book about Barack Obama, she must have felt a need to tone down her questioning. Seldom if ever did she ask a follow-up question and she addressed both candidates to answer the same gotcha types of questions.

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Filed under Gwen Ifell, Joe Biden, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate

>Polls Find Biden Wins

>A CNN poll of Americans who watched the vice presidential debate shows that most felt Sen. Joe Biden beat Gov. Sarah Palin, 51% to 36%.

A CBS News/Knowledge Networks poll of uncommitted voters show Biden winning 46% to 21% with 33% calling it a draw.

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Filed under CBS News, CNN, Joe Biden, Polls, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate

Polls Find Biden Wins

A CNN poll of Americans who watched the vice presidential debate shows that most felt Sen. Joe Biden beat Gov. Sarah Palin, 51% to 36%.

A CBS News/Knowledge Networks poll of uncommitted voters show Biden winning 46% to 21% with 33% calling it a draw.

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Filed under CBS News, CNN, Joe Biden, Polls, Sarah Palin, Vice-President debate